Throw out your keywords and go creative with your blog titles

For choosing your blog titles, here’s the advice I’m sure you’ve heard:

  • Build a keyword list of your blog’s main topic.
  • Choose some criteria to pick the most promising keywords (search volume, evidence of long tail, competition or CPC)
  • Write a post that has the keyword term in the page title, post title and at least a couple of times in the post body.
  • Spike in Traffic shown by Google Analytics

    Google Analytics doesn't lie - Sex Sells

    While I’m not saying the above doesn’t work, some of my most popular posts did not use the above methodology at all. Case in point: Recently I noticed people “frictionless sharing” an article from the Washington Post titled “4 Things You Do To Kill Her Sex Drive” on Facebook which I’m sure many were unaware that the Facebook social reader app was posting on their behalf. So I wrote an article on Facebook Social Reader Apps and recommended people review their app list in Facebook and take action to not broadcast to Facebook their browsing habits.

    I could have come up with a blog title such as “Beware of Facebook’s social reader” or “What are your Facebook social apps sharing about you?” Both are reasonable given the search volume on “social reader” and “Facebook social apps”. But I didn’t. I went for broke and used the title “Four Things You Do To Kill Her Sex Drive”. We don’t always like to admit it, but sex sells and is of interest to a broad audience (many which would find a discussion of Google Analytics totally boring). It seems that it worked, after I published the blog post Sunday night, my traffic jumped up significantly the next two days (see Google Analytics chart above).

    This highlights one drawback of using keyword tools, they show you historical data and won’t show you an emerging trend, which often is an excellent source of traffic. Catch such a wave and it will trump your most carefully crafted keyword rich post. Getting in on a new thing such as being the first to write a review of a new product or comment on a recent news worthy announcement are the opportunities to look for. There is a reason why news channels do so well. Twitter is excellent for this kind of prospecting as news is frequently reported there before the mass media picks it up. For regional trends, log in your Twitter account on twitter.com and check out the trends on the left for your area. For worldwide trends spend time with search.twitter.com.

    Also, something those of us that write more technically focused content lose sight of, don’t forget the importance of an inviting title. When you write your title, put your audience’s hat on, and ask yourself honestly, does this title compel me to click on it and find out more? Sometimes you just have to lose the keywords and write more creatively to perk up interest.

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About the Author Kathy Alice

Kathy Alice Brown is a SEO expert specializing in Technical SEO and Content. In her spare time she loves to get outside.

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Leave a Comment:

3 comments
Knoji says April 8, 2012

In writing article for the purpose of marketing or selling products online, you have to be very knowledgeable about the proper keywords to use as well as its popularity or traffic. Remember that you are targeting certain customers or buyers and the article will do the job of selling. There are also articles online written for the purpose of sharing information and providing facts based on some legitimate sources. Most of these websites are intended to make money through affiliates, page views, and text advertising. Whatever our purposes are we have to do our best in writing our articles and we have to think that our purpose is always for sharing knowledge to other people on the Internet. Thank you for sharing your great content.

Reply
Dermeval says September 30, 2012

Recently the number of visitors to my blog decreased about 25% and I do not know why but I’m worried.

After reading your article so I will try to see if I recover the visits.

Thanks for the tip.

(Google translator)

Reply
    Kathy Alice says October 1, 2012

    If there is a sharp drop that occurred on a particular day – compare that to the known dates of Google releases. One of the best lists is on seomoz.org. Good luck!

    Reply
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